Arizona has strict laws concerning dogs in public places, and when an animal’s bite causes you or a family member physical harm, its owner may be held liable for any injuries. There are more than 4.7 million dog bites that occur each year across the U.S. As reported by the American Veterinary Medical Association, close to one in every five of those dog bites requires medical attention. In addition to the animal’s bite tearing into the victim’s skin, which could require stitches, there are also potentially harmful microorganisms that may spread from the dog’s saliva. For health and safety reasons dogs are quarantined and checked for signs of disease for 10 days after a bite is reported in all of the metro Phoenix regions.

If a dog bites you or one of your children and causes an injury, you have the right to take legal action against its owner, walker or other caretaker. Whether the attack occurred at a park, in the street or on the dog owner’s property, financial relief may be obtained through a civil action to cover the resulting damages. Dog bite victims are typically children, who are also the most susceptible to suffering an injury requiring treatment.

A dog owner’s typical defense for countering a claim is that the animal was provoked by the individual who suffered the bite. It does not matter, however, if a dog’s owner was either aware or unaware of the animal’s tendency to bite or attack. Depending on how severe the dog’s bite is, a civil action may be filed to seek compensation for pain and suffering, medical treatments or lost wages.

This information is provided for educational purposes only, and should not be interpreted as legal advice.